The Grace to Embrace

We must remind ourselves, those of us practicing religion as a means of salvation rather than welfare, that the spiritual life, the life of God, is about God and not us. That we complain so often of our imperfections and the subsequent suffering is a misunderstanding of religion. Perhaps we think that spiritual life is about having a good time, that a good spiritual life is a life of mental and emotional security and perfect devotion. In the face of the slightest suffering we blame ourselves of spiritual failure as if perfection, spiritual or otherwise, was a human possibility!
It is a bad habit of our times, more so in the western hemisphere, that we should think everything is about us and how we feel, that anything that disturbs the emotions has an evil origin unless one sees the visible hand of God. We have a hard time accepting, let alone trusting, that whether we are in suffering or not God is working within and without. We feel that we must know his every move or else we lose faith and find ourselves in despair, as if He owes us an explanation on top of the possibility of salvation offered by grace, as if God has a โ€œBuy one get one for freeโ€ business!
We cannot trust in the invisible, thanks to our faulty culture and education; so instead of raising ourselves to God we bring Him down to our own mundane level which is no more Him but a projection of our own desires in one form or another. Our complaint over lack of spiritual perfection is the most destructive of all spiritual imperfections, for it indicates that we pursue the path so to feel good about ourselves; above all it indicates our lack of faith and trust in Him.
The best violins in the world were at once a seemingly useless pieces of wood. That wood has become the masterpiece that it is because it gave itself totally to the hands of a master who chopped and hammered it for thousands of hours. The best architect chooses the material that shows the highest degree of conformity to both the means and the final end of perfection.
Whenever we come to such moments of suffering, the dark nights of the soul, we must think ourselves, if we seek God rather than the self, as deformed souls under the hammer of God who is cutting away our imperfections. And by no means should we think or expect that we are on the way of becoming perfect beings in the face of God, for our perfection is in our non-being before Him: Our salvation is nothing but our annihilation in God.
We must ask of God nothing for ourselves except more consciousness of Himself. And we must remember that each blow of His hammer is a chance of becoming more conscious of Him. God’s hammer is the grace to embrace.

7 thoughts on “The Grace to Embrace

  1. That was really lovely, thank you.

    In the western world we do tend to think everything is about us and how we feel. Ironically that is precisely our problem and what leads to so much of our own suffering. We’ve have great comfort on the outside, but some rather miserable and unhappy people on the inside. Nearly always, my own suffering is simply too much of me and not enough of Him.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. I’m sure you’ve heard of the analogy of the process of the reparation of a ceramic pot. The vessel is broken and the artist repairs it with gold, thereby making it stronger than it ever was. I can tell you, I’ve had many Winters of my soul and still have not even come close to perfection. Thank you for the reminder that that is not what I’m after anyway!

    Liked by 3 people

  3. Hello, there Tomaj!
    By now, I see you have seen that I nominated you for the “Real Neat Blog Award” before I was able to comment on a post! ๐Ÿ™‚

    Surprise! You’re nominated! If you’d like to participate, that’d be fun. If not, I understand and your blog is still “Real Neat” in my book! ๐Ÿ™‚

    ~Sarah
    https://arttherapygirl.wordpress.com/2015/03/24/yay-somebody-thinks-im-swell-the-real-neat-blog-award/

    Liked by 1 person

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